An Investment Strategy

August 7, 2013 0 Comments
“Man surprised me most about humanity.Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health.And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.” -Dalai Lama

“Man surprised me most about humanity. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money.
Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.” -Dalai Lama

I am inspired by a story that comes from Mahatma Gandhi’s life.  At the height of India’s peaceful revolution, Gandhi’s advisors approached him with scheduling conflicts.  It seems that there were more demands on his time than there were hours in the day.  Their suggested resolution was to cut short the hour Gandhi spent every day meditating.  Gandhi, it is said, looked at the schedule, considered their options and replied to his advisers,  “It is clear that there are many important items on my schedule.  We must, therefore,  adjust my meditation schedule from one to two hours everyday.”

We live in fractured times.  Technology, shrinking incomes, job insecurity, toxins in our environment and hundreds of other distractions and threats come at us every day.  It is easy to be swept along a raging river of meaninglessness, anxiety, and adrenalin-fueled days.  The sadness is that we may wake up  one day and find that the neglect flowing over our minds, our health, and our souls has washed away our one non-renewable resource, the time to enjoy our lives on earth.

I promise you have time to exercise, eat right, breathe deeply, connect with family and friends or savor the day. For twenty-four hours, monitor the time you spend browsing the Internet, correcting a mistake you made by hurrying, obsessing over a slight you imagined (or experienced), and watching television.  Rate the return on investment of your current activities versus  time invested in yourself, your family and your friends.

How does your investment strategy stack up?  When you are in your last days, will you remember and be glad you watched that rerun of Breaking Bad?  Will you be thankful you scolded your child for snacking before dinner?  Will you wish you’d spent more time with the feet up in the recliner browsing the internet?

Do one thing today to change your outlook tomorrow, make your well-being part of your long-term investment strategy.  Namaste.  Becky

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